One need not spend much time on this site before realizing that there are very few posts — generally there are only three or four posts. Why so few? The answer is very simple: Often a post is a longer scripture commentary. When I create a new post, I convert the scripture commentary into a page. I do so because the pages are organized by topic and subtopic which makes it easier for the reader to find relevant material. Posts are organized by date and category which is generally helpful, but is not as useful a structure as what we find in the pages. So that’s why there are so few posts — most posts become pages.

P1120871_Louvre_stèle_de_Mésha_AO5066_2For several years the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) has engaged in projects to make digital photos of items available on the Internet. One project which garnered much attention is the Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library, launched in December 2012 in collaboration with Google. This site allows one to view and search high-resolution images of the complete Dead Sea Scrolls archive. Recently the IAA announced the Rockefeller Museum Online project which makes available online digital images of all artifacts in the Rockefeller Museum in Jerusalem. This is the first time time that the whole collection of a museum will be available in digital images online. The museum, originally named the Palestine Archaeological Museum, was established with funds donated by John D. Rockefeller in 1938. The name was changed after the 1967 war. The effort to place the collection online is funded by a grant from David Rockefeller, the son of John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

MazzoliBible2Dino (neé Leopoldo) Mazzoli, a retired artist, has created a handwritten and illustrated edition of the Bible. Mr. Mazzoli worked ten years to produce the 23 volume (1,473 page) masterpiece which includes about 5,000 color illustrations. The edition includes the full text of the Christian Community Bible. Sample pages from the work can be seen on Mr. Mazzoli’s web site and in news stories in Visual News and the Catholic Herald. The entire work is available for the iPad and iPhone in the iTunes App Store; all proceeds from the sell of the app go to the Claretians, who translated and produce the Christian Community Bible.

“Sunday, April 12, is the date the global Orthodox church will celebrate Easter Sunday, according to the Julian calendar. For the first time, perhaps in centuries, Iraqi and Syrian Christians, many of whom are Orthodox, will not celebrate Easter Westminster_Abbey_martyrs_stitch_cin their home churches, but rather in camps for refugees and displaced people.” (Timothy C. Morgan, Gleanings, NY Cardinal, ‘AD’ Producers Step Up Campaign against Mideast Persecution,
7 April 2015)

Persecution and killing of people due to their religious beliefs in the MiddleEast and Africa ought to weigh heavily on our hearts and minds. Those persecuted and their families should be in our prayers. But we need to do more. We need to speak out against the violence and intolerance, and we should assist those who have lost homes or livelihoods as a result of the persecution. Two websites which provide information on the situation and offer avenues to assist are 21martyrs and The Cradle Fund. I encourage you to visit these sites, read news reports from the regions, and prayerfully ask God to guide you in assisting our friends and enemies in the affected areas.

sunrise-153600_1280“To put it at its most basic: the resurrection of Jesus offers itself, to the student of history or science no less than the Christian or the theologian, not as an odd event within the world as it is but as the utterly characteristic, prototypical and foundational event within the world as it has begun to be. It is not an absurd event within the old world but the symbol and starting point of the new world. The claim advanced in Christianity is of that magnitude: Jesus of Nazareth ushers in not simply a new religious possibility, not simply a new ethic or a new way of salvation, but a new creation.”
— N.T. Wright, Surprised by Hope, p.67

Recommended reading for today: Seven Stanzas at Easter by John Updike.

CrossofashesThe Ash Wednesday liturgy has the very memorable line, “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return” (BCP, p.265). This stark sentence is said while the priest imposes ashes. The liturgy makes the strong point that none of us will live forever: we all die. Often a person thinks of a life-ending situation and says, “If I were to die …”, but the correct wording is, “When I die, …”. Lent, a time of preparation for Easter, is a time to prepare for one’s death. This doesn’t mean only spiritual preparation but also preparation with regard to practical, material concerns.

There are many things which a responsible person ought to do to prepare for death. One item, necessary for all of us, is to make a will. Another is to document your wishes with regard to your funeral or memorial service. One should also have a living will and/or power of attorney in case of a serious illness or injury which doesn’t lead immediately to death. There are many other things one should deal with in preparation for death. Two web pages which provide brief but useful guides are One Day, You’re Going to Die. Here’s How to Prepare for It and You Don’t Have to Spend a Ton on a Funeral — Here’s Why. There is a lot of information on the web pertaining to planning of funerals, writing wills, preparing a power of attorney, and other end-of-life concerns. These two web pages will help you get started and you can use a search engine to find additional information on any of the action items.

Use the time of Lent to prepare for your death; dealing with these issues while you live will keep your loved ones from having to deal with them in their time of grief. It’s the responsible thing to do.

Got LentLent is upon us. It is traditional to have a Lenten discipline — to adopt a habit which assists in capturing the spirit of the season. Traditionally one gives up something for Lent: chocolate is a popular choice, as is alcohol. However, it is sometimes better to take on something as a Lenten discipline than to give up something. One may adopt a new daily prayer schedule, for example, or decide to perform a “random act of kindness each day”. Jan Risher, in a post on the Advertiser, has a good suggestion. Her idea is to write a letter of thanks to someone each day. We all have people to whom we’re indebted for an act of kindness, someone who gave us a helping hand. Ms. Risher’s idea for a Lenten discipline is to choose one of these people each day and hand write a letter of thanks. The letter is certain to be appreciated, and offering thanks to (and for) the people who have helped us in our journeys is sure to improve our spiritual outlook. This is a very good idea.